Campaign season…Western Germany, Summer 1759

 

 

We are going to kick off our campaign based on the French summer offensive in 1759. This places the action just after the battle of Bergen, a French victory, and the subsequent campaigning afterwards. As discussed in the previous post, the campaign track will drive the narrative with campaign fortunes and tribulations along with battle fought.

So without further ado, let us begin the campaign…

 

Opening ‘Moves’

The beginning of the campaign starts with the initial dice roll movement of the campaign track ‘army’ markers. The run of dice produced the following sequence of events.

Note, I have used the British flag for the Anglo-German marker as it is nice and distinctive against the white background of the campaign track.

 Starting positions. Both the Anglo-German and French markers are on the ‘start’ space. White dice are D6 and the black dice a DAverage. The DAv dice is used on some Fortune Cards for movement.

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As the French are launching their summer offensive, they roll first – they score a 2, moving them along two spaces.

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The Anglo-German force counters with a score a 2. itself, moving them along two spaces. 

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The French roll again and score 3 – pushing them ever closer to the first engagement.

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The British follow up with a score of 2 – delivering them a Fortune Card. The card drawn is the ‘Men…Rally!’ This card will be a battle card and could prove very useful in the first encounter soon to be had.

Note- the card is kept hidden from the opposing player (shown here so you can see it).

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The French, lunging forward, score 3 and fall just short of the first battle box….will the Anglo-Germans pass them by and initiate battle or perhaps another score of 2 will deliver them an outmanoeuvring result pushing their fortunes along onto the next track level?

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Prince Ferdinand, the Anglo-German commanding general, is not for outmanoeuvring on this occasion. He rolls a score of 5 which moves him into the battle box. Even though he scores more than the 4 required to enter the box, this is ignored. A force that lands in a battle box must always stop and initiate battle – as the attacker.

In addition, the Anglo-German player draws one Fortune Card. He draws the ‘Steals a March‘ card which is very handy as it enables a good deal of control on the campaign track. When played the card offers the controlling side a +/-1drm modifier to any campaign move die roll. This can be very useful for progressing up the ‘ladders’ on the campaign track. It is perhaps most useful on the top track where the exact score is required to land on the Final Battle box….which delivers campaign victory.

Lastly, the Anglo-German player rolls a d6 to determine the upcoming battle. He scores a 2, resulting in the initial skirmish battle being the Combat at St. Ulrich scenario from the Honours of War rule book.

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With that, the first battle is set to play and campaign movement ceases. All of the above literally took less than 5 minutes to play through before getting to the first battle. From now on, the sequence of battle campaign movement is undertaken, thus at the conclusion of an engagement players spend the next 5 minutes of so moving along the track and setting up their next campaign game. This will enable players to consider the next battle that is selected and create their forces as per the scenario conditions, which keeps pre game preparation to and absolute minimum and maximises game time.

So, from the campaign track we have established that Ferdinand’s Anglo-German will be launching a localised counter attack on the French held bridgehead at the town of St. Ulrich, no doubt to continue their march and do their enemy harm as best they can and establish a bridgehead over the fast flowing (and impassable) River Schwartz.

See you next time for the battle report…

 


The table is set, battle to be joined in the sleepy town of St. Ulrich…can Ferdinand’s forces drive off the French defenders?

2 thoughts on “Campaign season…Western Germany, Summer 1759

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